Posts

Cheryl Peltekis, RN “The Solutionist”

One of the biggest challenges your organization faces is in getting enough referrals for the company to remain profitable. Many times, organizations think they can get enough business from just websites and word of mouth and I will tell you, these are the ones that typically don’t succeed.

If you look around at the top 5 organizations in your market, I guarantee you that they have a sales representative or a team of sales representatives. If you ask agency leadership, “what is the biggest challenge your sales representatives face today when trying to gain new business?” The answers are usually the same.

1.  Staffing.

2.  Having a Sales Rep that can get past the gatekeeper.

3.  Gaining relationships with the hospitals.

4.  Contracting with insurance companies.

5.  Leadership can’t relate to sales team personality and demands.

Today I want to share with you a few tips so you can get past the gatekeeper and gain more private duty, home health, and hospice referrals.

Here are your 5 tips to learn how to overcome the 5 Challenges:

 

1.  CHALLENGE: Staffing.

Buy the Recruiting and Retention program. One tip from the program will be worth 10X the cost. So many companies waste money by placing ads that aren’t effective. So many ads are placed and potential candidates are lost to a slow culture at an organization. This program will help you evaluate your current process, and give it an upgrade!

2.  CHALLENGE: Having a sales rep that can get past the gatekeeper.

If your sales rep can not get to the referral source they can’t build a relationship that produces referrals. We got you! Buy the High-Performance Sales Academy! This program teaches not only a repeatable, successful sales process but how to get past the gatekeepers to put it in action!

3.  CHALLENGE: Gaining relationships with the hospitals.

Hospitals can be a real challenge to gain access. In fact, we teach a whole class on how to access the hospitals in our High-Performance Sales Academy and spend time role-playing out the situations every month on our group coaching calls and really take the sales reps through all the what-if scenarios. You may also need to get a vendor clearance and your organization may also have to purchase in referral exchange EMR’s.

However, one way that almost always works, and it doesn’t require any special referral software, is to have your sales representative go visit any of your active patients that get admitted to the hospital. The sales representative can go visit the patient and after they see the patient, stop at the desk and ask them to page the discharge planner that has your patient’s room assigned to them. When the Case manager arrives, you now have a chance to do your qualifying sales call and find out if this hospital discharge planner has both the willingness and the ability to refer to your organization.

You want to be prepared to ask several questions so you can then easily position your organization to obtain referrals.  Here are a few examples of what I would ask. All of this is also taught in our High-Performance Sales Academy and more!

    • What agency do you currently refer most of your patients to? This question typically gets an answer that is something like: We offer patient choice, or we provide the patient with a list.
    • Can you show me if my organization is on your list?  If you’re not on the list, you can write a letter to the hospital corporate compliance officer to request to be on the list.  If you are on the list, you can say something like “Great, I’m so glad that you offer freedom of choice.
    • Could you share with me: What criteria you use to help your patients receive guidance on selecting an agency from the list? How do they know what providers are great at wound care? Or How do they know what providers take their insurance? Or how do they know who can provide 24-hour care at home?
    • Can you share with me 2 examples of when you had to refer a patient to a different provider than your preferred provider?
    • How often do you have to give a referral to someone other than your preferred providers?
    • Do you have trouble getting services provided quickly in any of the counties?
    • Could you share with me 3 things that you love about referring to your preferred agency?
    • Could you share with me 3 challenges that you have experienced in working with your preferred provider?
    • Would you be willing to try my organization if I can solve any of your challenges?
    • Is there someone else that is going home today that is just like my current patient, Mrs. Jones that I could also provide care to?

4. CHALLENGE: Contracting with Insurance companies.

Here is a secret. The busiest agencies in ton don’t have to chase after the insurance contracts. The insurance companies approach them to become a provider.

You see, when an insurance company comes into your area, they go to the hospitals and get them to become a provider. Then they ask who do you refer to? They get contracts with all the post-acute care preferred providers.

If you are not currently getting hospital referrals, you will probably be overlooked.

If you want to find the insurances that are providing care in your town just shop as if you are looking for insurance in the zip codes that you provide care. Here is the link to find the information Find Medicare Insurance Providers.

5.  CHALLENGE: Leadership can’t relate to the sales team.

I could go on for days talking about leadership failures when it comes to supporting sales reps. I myself as an agency owner have made many! Thankfully I have learned so much over my 28 years as a professional working in post-acute care.

Sales teams are like herding cats. They are loud, demanding, and want everything yesterday! If they weren’t they wouldn’t be successful. Now, of course, we have some really nice, people who are super successful too.

Often, it takes a strong personality to get past gatekeepers, and if you are not a strong personality, we have our Orientation and High-Performance Sales Academy that will teach you how to do it and still be your true authentic self.  But building a culture that supports sales is critical.

 

If you are an executive or owner and you just are exhausted managing your team, we got you! We are now managing sales teams around the country! We have expanded our team and hired a new incredible sales coach to support us.

Home Care Sales has grown so much over the last few years! We are prepared to expand even more over the next few years! Our sales management includes everything you need to go about your work of getting patients cared for while we take over the daily management of your sales representatives.

We include pdf flyers (personalized for your organizations), sales messages of the week with trigger questions, and all the teaching and coaching your salesperson wants or needs! What to learn more? Set up a time to meet with Mike@homecaresales.com (you can jump on his calendar here).

Melanie and I care about your success. We are on a mission to help every patient that needs and deserves care to get identified for services!

 

Let us help you by having you join in working with us!

Cheryl Pelekis, RN “The Solutionist”

 

 

Cheryl Peltekis, RN “The Solutionist”

There are plenty of jobs these days, and candidates have the power to pick and choose. You need to make candidates feel wanted and enthusiastic about your company. Otherwise, they will quickly find another one that does.

The interview process now is as much about the potential employee sizing you up as you, sizing them up.

The world is getting faster. Your customers are expecting you to deliver yesterday, and your competition is quickening.

The best talent is used to moving quickly, and they want to work with ambitious, innovative, and fast-moving organizations. If you can’t hire quickly, not only do you lose time and money within the business, but you may also lose great candidates to more agile competition.

Worst of all, you will gain a reputation as slow-moving, bureaucratic, and backward thinking.

 

If you can’t keep up, you will find yourself at the back of the pack. If you know that your organization is slow-moving, for example, you place an ad to hire aides, and then the person who is responsible for reviewing the applicants is on vacation for a week, you probably wasted your money placing that ad.

I interviewed several RN’s and asked them what made them leave where they were working. The number one reason that nurses have left their place of employment is overworked. Having the nurses do too many patients visits per day makes them burn out fast.

So, what’s the solution?

 

Do we turn down business? What can you do to keep staff while you are trying to hire and orient new staff? How do you increase the speed of hiring?

These are the questions that we want to answer for you! That is why we created our Recruiting and Retention Program. You can buy our recruiting and retention program and get instant access right now!

 

Keep Helping, Keep Serving,

Cheryl Pelekis, RN “The Solutionist”

 

 

Cheryl Peltekis, RN “The Solutionist”

In most cases, people wouldn’t bat an eyelid if you’d use the word teaching instead of coaching or vice versa. And why would they?

They both seem to mean the same thing. That is, instructing a student. By nature, however, they both fulfill different roles and serve other purposes.

Teaching (Sales Process, Orientation to the industry)

As we already know, teaching is the imparting of new knowledge or instructions to someone else. 

A teacher is a subject expert who imparts wisdom, an experienced professional. However, the line between a teacher and a coach is drawn at their relationship with the student.

Teachers help students learn, and that’s the end of it.

Teaching is focused on imparting knowledge and learning, where the teacher is in charge of the interaction. It has little to do with the student as an individual.

Teaching a sales process falls flat on gaining a referring producing sales professional unless you add coaching.

 

Coaching (Discussing real challenges, offering guidance beyond the “know-how”)

Coaching is taking what you learned from the teacher and applying it to everyday work in the field as a sales professional. Coaches focus on the development and guidance of sales representatives. In a way, coaches help students grow as individuals, enabling students to refine their skills and find direction.

Coaches, just like teachers, guide a change in students, be it through education, knowledge, or advice. However, here’s where the critical difference lies: the student entirely dictates a coach’s guidance.

Coaching is about helping the student bring out what they already have or know. And that’s how coaches help students change without dictating the change themselves.

This is why our sales management is so effective.

We have brought both the teaching and the coaching under one program to deliver incredible results. Just last week I heard from one of our clients who used Home Care Sales for both teaching and coaching their sales representatives. 

They started on their journey by having me come to their organization, where I taught the High-Performance Sales Academy. Then the owner invested in coaching their team.

Last week their sales manager reported that by adding our sales management, and road map to referrals, they have grown by 50% over the previous year! 

Teaching guides with knowledge and advice acquired by the teacher, coaching guides with knowledge and advice, which is based on the individual.

So is a coach a teacher or a teacher a coach?

Well, no. They can’t both exist at the same time. This distinction that we’ve just established is less about discriminating between the two and more about understanding and appreciating the ‘coaches’ in our lives. Nonetheless, it’s essential to understand that teachers are still facilitators of knowledge. Ideally, it would serve the world better to have more coaches than teachers, but that is just an indicator of the flaws of our current system. 

Coaches can help bring out the best in sales representatives. Now our sales management provides both the teaching and the coaching together. But we didn’t stop there. We added accountability.  

  • We have the sales representative complete an expectation document that we developed with the owner/administrators.
  • We provide a CRM to document the High-Performance Sales Process in your sales calls, automate weekly sales call purpose, and trigger questions.
  • We provide coaching to personalize navigation through complex sales challenges.
  • We have combined the industry’s top sales teaching for the first 12 weeks in conjunction with expert coaching to overcome any obstacles.  

As a profession, we’ve probably underestimated the value of those who call themselves coaches. This is not to say that we haven’t misunderstood many teachers, who may have actually coached us.

Coaching is a cycle. The job doesn’t end after instruction. Coaches begin by teaching students; they then observe how and what the students learn and then re-evaluate the teaching approach to provide a better understanding.

What does it mean for the post-acute care community?

Whether you refer to them as teachers or coaches, not much changes. Cheryl (Me) and Melanie are both naturally equipped to help your sales associate learn and master how to manage referral sources. If you want your sales representative to start driving in referrals sign up here for our sales management done for you program. It takes teaching and coaching to the next level!  

 

Keep Helping, Keep Serving,

Cheryl Pelekis, RN “The Solutionist”

 

 

Cheryl Peltekis, RN “The Solutionist”

There comes a time when every agency needs to hire a new sales manager.

The owner or administrator can’t keep up with the sales rep’s needs for support, knowledge, and continued motivation.

Let’s be honest some salespeople are big kids with unmanaged ADHD. Their attention spans last a whole 30 seconds.

Let me share the top attributes to use as a guide to follow to ensure you have the right sales manager in place. According to an article in the Harvard Business Review, salespeople have several recognizable attributes.

Below I have laid out my summary of the key attributes that make a salesperson successful.

Here is the summary:

Focus on hitting goals. Evidence has shown that great sales leaders keep their team focused and moving forward with a sense of urgency, regardless of the circumstances.

That is why our Sales Management Done-for-You includes a weekly reporting on hitting goals. Unless your team knows what goals they need to hit, they run around with no target in sight.

Accountability. Seventy-five percent of high-performing sales managers agreed that their salespeople are consistently measured and held accountable against their quota. The leaders establish this culture using a “carrot and stick” psychological approach that sets up a competitive environment.

Accountability is why home care sales management done for you includes a CRM powered by “Playmaker Health.” Having iron grip control of the reps begins with responsibility.

Using our CRM allows us to set up a competitive environment with representatives competing not just within their organization but nationwide for recognition on a bigger stage! Essentially, the command instinct is responsible for creating the peer-pressure and attention-seeking environment that eliminates complacency.

Sales Educator. Sales Management is a mentorship-based profession, and a key differentiator of great sales leaders is their ability to dispense tactical sales advice. The practical knowledge gained from the experiences of participating in sales cycles and managing salespeople—is directly associated with their success.

Sales Process-Driven. Forty-three percent of high-performing sales managers responded that their sales process was closely monitored, strictly enforced, or automated, compared to 29% of underperforming sales managers. Forty-four percent of underperforming sales managers indicated they had a nonexistent or an informal, structured sales process.

That is why Home Care Sales has developed and has a proven sales process. The High-Performance Sales Certification is earned by each sales rep that we place in our sales management program.

Coaching adaptability. Home Care Sales managers understand the many different learning needs of individuals. That is what makes our sales management so successful. We make sure that we hit all the buttons that impact visual learners, auditory learners, doers, and thinkers—we deliver learning content via live pieces of training and coaching sessions.

Also, we provide content in the written word and video. Reps and managers join our coaching sessions with role-play scenarios to work through. See one, do one, and teach one! Become a success with Home Care Sales Management!

Strategic leadership. All sales leaders are battlefield commanders who must devise the organization’s sales strategy to defeat the competition. This requires plotting the best course of action to maximize revenue using the most cost-effective sales model.

Great sales leaders possess the knowledge to correctly deploy field or inside salespeople, segment the market into verticals, and specialize sales teams by product or customer types. This helps explain why there was a 51% quota performance gap between high-performing and underperforming sales leaders last year.

High-performing sales leaders reported an overall average annual quota attainment of 105% compared to 54% for underperforming sales managers.

Conclusion:

The sales team is unique and unlike any other department of a company. The best sales organizations have strong leaders who exercise control and establish the code of behavior that all team members must abide by. They employ their experiences to determine strategic direction and coach team members individually.

Most importantly, they know how to keep the team on track and focused on winning.

If you are ready to have a sales team that exceeds expectations, then email Mike@homecaresales.com or go HERE to have your rep managed by HCS

.

Keep Helping, Keep Serving,

Cheryl Pelekis, RN “The Solutionist”

 

 

Cheryl Peltekis, RN “The Solutionist”

Sales Managers assume 100% of the responsibility for the performance of their sales team, yet receive little glory for their efforts.

I have worked with so many different management positions in our industry. Large clients that have 8 sales managers, down to “Mom and Pop’s” that the owner him/herself is the sales manager. 

In most cases, sales managers earn less than their top salespeople. They have the responsibility of evaluating territories, hiring, training, teaching CRM, and they must deliver the number of admits/hours to hit budget.  

Yes, the best sales managers work longer hours, endure more stress, and have a greater responsibility than the salespeople they manage. They are looked down upon by most clinical management and forever in need of something! 

Making things worse is the fact that salespeople are harder to lead and manage than any other employee type that work at our organizations. 

Sales account executives are emotional and often irrational people who demand attention. Because salespeople are essentially in jobs where rejection is the norm, sales managers are often called upon to be coaches, mentors, mothers, fathers, and sometimes therapists to keep their troops motivated, focused, and delivering on sales goals.

If this is not hard enough, sales managers are often put in the position of shielding their salespeople from corporate policy police, accountants, and operators who have absolutely no understanding of the psychology of salespeople.

It is a wonder why any sane human being would voluntarily choose to be a sales manager.

Though each year thousands of sales professionals give up their sales roles and accept the promotion. They move into new offices and proudly stare at their newly printed business cards with little understanding of what it takes to lead salespeople.

Ill-prepared to perform the job of sales manager, a high percentage of these newly-minted sales leaders are demoted or fired within 18 months. Unfortunately, the sales profession is a graveyard littered with the corpses of failed sales managers who (had they embraced one important principle) might have gone on to become superstars.

Leadership Principle #1

In sales leadership, one principle stands above all: You need your people more than they need you. Another way of saying this is that you get paid for what your salespeople do, not for what you do.

Who Is More Important: You or Your Salespeople?

The fact is, even if the sales manager went on a two-week vacation, and all of your salespeople showed up each day, things would likely be just fine. The work would get done.

Sales Managers Get Paid For What Their People Do

When you get your next paycheck, take a close look at it. The money deposited in your bank account was a direct result of your salespeople’s work. You were rewarded for their performance or non-performance—not yours. To tell yourself anything different is an outright denial of the facts.

As a sales leader, if your salesperson succeeds, you succeed. If your salesperson fails, you fail.

So, it follows that your job is to position your people to win. You must create an environment in which they can succeed, develop their skills, leverage their talents, and remove roadblocks so that they sell. You need them more than they need you. Anything that you do that impedes their success hurts you!

It is time for you to reconsider who manages your team. Home Care Sales has a new sales management program.  It comes with a CRM powered by Playmaker, and it replaces your current sales leader for a fraction of the cost.

Take Dave, a director of sales with four salespeople on his team. Dave constantly demanded insignificant reporting on virtually everything. Each time he asked for a report, it took his people away from sales activities that generated revenue.

One of his salespeople said, “He drove me over the edge of insanity. I’d be on my way to see a referral source, and he’d call me wanting a report on something stupid right then like it was the most important thing in the world.”

What happened to Dave? Dave’s goose was cooked because the talented account executives he had inherited when he took the job quit. He eventually lost a great job and thousands of dollars in incentive bonus because instead of helping his people succeed, he became a roadblock to success.

Far too many sales managers never learn this lesson.

The single most important leadership principle is this: You get paid for what your people do, not what you do.  You need your salespeople more than they need you. Give them what they want!

Imagine, your salesperson is armed with a sales message that produces referrals. Your sales team has beautiful, branded flyers and clearly spelled out expectation documents to ensure compliance. Our Sales Management done for you has all this and more.

    • CRM for account management
    • Sales Process personalized in the CRM.
    • Weekly sales messages for the entire year
    • 12 weeks of onboarding sales training
    • Monthly automated reports sent to leadership.

We are weeks away from launching our new program. Only 25 spots are being offered. Sign up today before they are gone. Sales Management done by Home Care Sales is the solution to your growth challenges. Let us help you! 

Keep Helping, Keep Serving,

Cheryl Pelekis, RN “The Solutionist”

 

 

Cheryl Peltekis, RN “The Solutionist”

A new report from the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) may not offer many surprises, but it summarizes the financial impact COVID had on physician groups. 

The organization, which represents group practices of all stripes, found an unexpected surge in physician retirement last year. (One-third of practice leaders reported seeing that trend in their groups.)

Medical directors who retired left vacancies in positions and practices with overwhelmed physicians trying to serve patients via telehealth.  

 

A recent article by a Health Leader says that nearly every group saw a drop in patient volume in April 2020, and 71% said they saw a drop of 50% or more.

By June 2020, however, a recovery was underway. Practices began reporting higher levels of work RVUs in that month than they had seen in February and March of 2020. Despite that recovery, more than 80% of practice leaders said that some or all of their providers saw their compensation take a hit.

 

Additionally, the report shared six factors that healthcare leaders identified as helping their medical practices survive the impacts of the pandemic:

 

  1. Rapid and efficient response to relief aid efforts
  2. Staffing stability and resilience
  3. Finding the correct telehealth offerings to utilize for their practices
  4. Reexamining payments and collections for patients
  5. Keeping communication and engagement open with patients through digital means and phone calls
  6. Addressing concerns of employee well-being

 

One thing I know is true: Doctors’ billing practices have changed. They couldn’t upcode for advance care planning because the process to do this was developed with in-person visits at the doctor’s office as the focus.  That sees this billing opportunity (as well as many others) gone almost overnight.  

Now is the time to revisit your physican’s office accounts and see how you can help. Could they benefit from learning how to bill for advance care planning? Maybe they need to learn how to bill for care plan oversight? Perhaps they need to understand transitional care management? 

How about partnering with your referral sources to help them achieve their telehealth visits? (I once heard a rumor that some seniors are technology-challenged…)

You and your agency can make a difference for your doctor’s accounts and help them make more revenue by providing solutions that their brick and mortar business practice simply wasn’t made to solve.

Could you or your team of sales representatives confidently teach MD offices these billing tactics? Could you help them and give your physician accounts a solid reason for them to stay loyal to your organization? If you or your team need to learn more, email Mike@homecaresales.com. We have a master’s program in selling that teaches this and more!  

 

Keep Helping, Keep Serving,

Cheryl Pelekis, RN “The Solutionist”